ourinfinitethoughts:

myomy:

funonthehorizon:

smilefordays:

imxespeon:

cophinescockerspaniels:

thegaywomenchannel:

We did a “First Kiss” experiment and asked 15 homophobic people to hug a gay stranger. 

And guess what. It wasn’t so bad.

the girl with the beanie is totally flipping that girl

Beautiful

she really is flipping that girl lmao

"I think you’re a nice guy, but the type of sex you have is gross" "I think your sex is gross too

I like the old lady. She went from “Oh! Oh!” “There. It’s not so bad, is it?” to “You actually remind me of my husband.”

Guy 1: “I did shave before I came here…”
Guy 2: “Shave where?”
Straight: “My b-…..” -looks around panicky- “Face”

(via callmetherovingjewel)

I kissed a girl and I liked it — Silvio Berlusconi (via mirrowthings)
Du kennst doch bestimmt den Spruch, dass Gott die Menschen nach seinem Ebenbild erschaffen hat. Guck dich mal um! Wenn man davon ausgeht, dass Gott ein Arschloch ist, ergibt das plötzlich mächtig viel Sinn. Känguru (aus Die Känguru Chroniken von Marc-Uwe Kling)
no-great-secret:

MARC-UWE KLING (Das Känguru-Manifest)

no-great-secret:

MARC-UWE KLING (Das Känguru-Manifest)

windyblues:

alizabug:

I’ve posted this before but this gives me strength when I have none

I’m not in the least sorry to reblog this.

(via fan-troll)

currentsinbiology:

Sponges Oxygenated the Earth (NY TIMES)
Dr.Tim Lenton, an earth systems scientist at the University of Exeter, suspects that 700 million years ago, sponges living on the sea floor played an important role in oxygenating the oceans. This allowed more complex organisms to evolve.giving rise to the animal kingdom as we know it today.

“This story is about the first animals bootstrapping the environment into one where more complex animals could evolve,” said Dr. Lenton. “This is essentially the birth of the modern world.”

Dr. Lenton and his colleagues describe their hypothesis in the journal Nature Geoscience.
A Venus’ flower basket sponge. Sponges may have played a role in making human life possible.  Credit Steve Payne for The New York Times

currentsinbiology:

Sponges Oxygenated the Earth (NY TIMES)

Dr.Tim Lenton, an earth systems scientist at the University of Exeter, suspects that 700 million years ago, sponges living on the sea floor played an important role in oxygenating the oceans. This allowed more complex organisms to evolve.giving rise to the animal kingdom as we know it today.

“This story is about the first animals bootstrapping the environment into one where more complex animals could evolve,” said Dr. Lenton. “This is essentially the birth of the modern world.”

Dr. Lenton and his colleagues describe their hypothesis in the journal Nature Geoscience.

A Venus’ flower basket sponge. Sponges may have played a role in making human life possible. Credit Steve Payne for The New York Times

kewkitty:

Kitty does not know what to do with the butterfly that landed on its paw.

kewkitty:

Kitty does not know what to do with the butterfly that landed on its paw.

(via luasuicide)